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On internet privacy, Coffman breaks with congressional Republicans

John Tomasic (The Colorado Statesman)- Colorado 6th District U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman broke with his Republican caucus colleagues this week to vote against a bill that would allow internet companies to sell user data, including user browsing histories.

“I believe the privacy of my constituents, and other internet users, is an issue where the government needs to tread very carefully,” he was quoted in a statement. “I do not believe we should permit private corporations to take advantage of our information for their use and profit. The right to privacy is embedded in the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, and as a person who tries to honor our Constitution, I chose to oppose the resolution as a reaffirmation in my belief in our founding document.”

Click here to read the full story in The Colorado Statesman.

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Nor’wood negoatiates to buy government land southwest of downtown

Pam Zubeck (Colorado Springs Independent)- If at first you don’t succeed, work out a new deal and continue moving forward.

That might be an apt description of Nor’wood Development Group’s efforts to gain control of land located in the Southwest Downtown Urban Renewal Area owned by the Pikes Peak Regional Building Department.

After an agreement with RBD collapsed last fall due to conflict of interest questions and legal requirements, Nor’wood persuaded the Regional Building board, composed of elected officials, to simply sell the property to Nor’wood without placing it on the open market.

Click here to read the full story in the Colorado Springs Independent.

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Sharp elbows, dark money: Is this new normal for Colorado Springs city elections?

Jakob Rodgers, Billie Stanton Anleu (Colorado Springs Gazette)- Dark money, high-dollar campaigns and sharp-elbow politicking are playing an unusually big role in this year’s contests for the City Council, longtime political observers say.

The veiled donations and rough-and-tumble tactics in a few races highlight the stakes in an election that could reshape the priorities of the city’s legislative body.

Six of the council’s nine seats are in play. So come April 4, the City Council could be stacked with candidates more willing to follow the lead of strong Mayor John Suthers.

Click here to read the full story in the Colorado Springs Gazette.

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Colorado public records mediation bill gets a new trial with big amendments

Joey Bunch (Colorado Springs Gazette)- My friend and former coworker Jeffrey Roberts says legislation to help people seeking public records avoid a courtroom to get them is getting a retrial.

On the Colorado Freedom of Information Coalition blog, Roberts said House Bill 1177 was reworked to create a cooling off period, a meeting between the record requester and its custodian and shared cost for mediation, which is about $75 an hour.

The House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee passed the legislation 9-0 Thursday and moves next to the House floor.

Click here to read the full story in the Colorado Springs Gazette.

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Publisher Still Preparing to Sue Lawmaker for Calling his Newspaper “Fake News”

Jason Salzman (Huffington Post)- The publisher of the Grand Junction Sentinel insisted Wednesday night that he’s getting his “ducks in a row” in preparation to sue Colorado State Sen. Ray Scott (R-Grand Junction) for labeling the Sentinel “fake news.”

“Have you attempted to patch things up with Sen. Scott?” 9News anchor Kyle Clark asked Jay Seaton, publisher of the Grand Junction Sentinel last night, prior to panel discussion on media issues streamed on Facebook. “You’re going to be covering him for years to come. There’s nothing to be gained by media outlets fighting with public officials like this.”

Click here to read the full story in Huffington Post.

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Democratic lawmakers take on dark money in elections communications

Marianne Goodland (Colorado Independent)- Last year, at least four campaign fliers showed up in voters’ mailboxes in the Front Range that didn’t disclose who paid for the mailers.

As The Colorado Independent reported, the mailers, all on behalf of Republican candidates for state House and Senate, contained information the Democratic candidates said was inaccurate. It’s against the law to make knowingly false claims, but there was no way to complain about it because the mailers didn’t identify who paid for them. State law requires a mailer contain a disclaimer saying who paid for it only if it comes from an independent expenditure committee, which cannot directly coordinate with candidates. Mailers, TV and radio and Internet ads that come from candidates and political parties do not have to include a disclaimer.

Click here to read the full story in the Colorado Independent.

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Lawmakers endorse optional ‘cooling-off period’ to resolve records disputes without litigation

Jeffrey Roberts (Colorado Freedom of Information Coalition)- A Colorado House committee Thursday endorsed a completely reworked proposal to encourage the resolution of open-records disputes without litigation.

The new version of HB 17-1177 essentially makes mediation optional. If a requester files a notice of intent to sue over a records denial, a government entity would have 14 days to meet with the requester in person or by phone. A professional mediator would get involved if both parties agree and share the cost.

Click here to read the full story in Colorado Freedom of Information Coalition.

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Democrats announce bills to curd the influence of money in politics

Peter Marcus (Colorado Politics)- House Democrats on Wednesday announced a package of legislation aimed at curbing the influence of money in politics.

“It is no secret that there is a lot of cynicism about political entities today and the dark money that is spent on political campaigns,” House Speaker Crisanta Duran, D-Denver, said at an afternoon news conference at the Capitol. “Last year’s election was one of the worst examples we have seen.”

Click here to read the full story in Colorado Politics.

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Colorado Democrats propose reforms to shed more light on political “dark money”

Brian Eason (Denver Post)- Colorado House Speaker Crisanta Duran on Wednesday rolled out a series of bills to require that more “dark money” be disclosed under the state’s campaign finance laws, calling it a necessary step to ensure that out-of-state interests can’t “drown out the voice of our people.”

The four bills, all sponsored by Democrats, won’t stop — and probably won’t even slow — the flow of out-of-state money, but they would make it easier, in some cases, to see where the money’s coming from.

Click here to read the full story in the Denver Post.

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Let’s discuss ‘fake news’ in a time of ‘alternative facts’

Nicole Vap (9News)- KUSA – Let’s have a conversation about “fake news” stories, and the truth.

9NEWS and Next anchor Kyle Clark hosted a panel discussion about fighting “fake news” in a time of “alternative facts.”

Our conversation included Jay Seaton, publisher of the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel, will talk about his threats to sue a state senator for defamation after the senator described the paper as “fake news.” Sen. Ray Scott, a West Slope Republican, accused the Sentinel of printing “fake news” following a story about a pending bill to change the state’s public records law. Sen. Scott declined multiple invitations to take part in the interview, citing the pending lawsuit. He said he would change his mind if Seaton “swears off his lawsuit”.

You can see our full panel discussion here.

Click here to read the full story on 9News.

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